The Culture of Copying in Japan
Language: un
Pages: 288
Authors: Rupert Cox
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-09-12 - Publisher: Routledge
This book challenges the perception of Japan as a ‘copying culture’ through a series of detailed ethnographic and historical case studies. It addresses a question about why the West has had such a fascination for the adeptness with which the Japanese apparently assimilate all things foreign and at the same time such a fear of their skill at artificially remaking and automating the world around them. Countering the idea of a Japan that deviously or ingenuously copies others, it elucidates the history of creative exchanges with the outside world and the particular myths, philosophies and concepts which are emblematic of the origins and originality of copying in Japan. The volume demonstrates the diversity and creativity of copying in the Japanese context through the translation of a series of otherwise loosely related ideas and concepts into objects, images, texts and practices of reproduction, which include: shamanic theatre, puppetry, tea utensils, Kyoto town houses, architectural models, genres of painting, calligraphy, and poetry, ‘sample’ food displays, and the fashion and car industries.
Making Japanese Heritage
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Christoph Brumann, Rupert A. Cox
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-12-16 - Publisher: Routledge
This book examines the making of heritage in contemporary Japan, investigating the ways in which particular objects, practices and institutions are ascribed public recognition and political significance. Through detailed ethnographic and historical case studies, it analyses the social, economic, and even global political dimensions of cultural heritage. It shows how claims to heritage status in Japan stress different material qualities of objects, places and people - based upon their ages, originality and usage. Following on an introduction that thoroughly assesses the field, the ethnographic and historiographic case studies range from geisha; noh masks; and the tea ceremony; urban architecture; automata; a utopian commune and the sites of Mitsubishi company history. They examine how their heritage value is made and re-made, and appraise the construction of heritage in cases where the heritage value resides in the very substance of the object’s material composition - for example, in architecture, landscapes and designs - and show how the heritage industry adds values to existing assets: such as sacredness, urban charm or architectural and ethnic distinctiveness. The book questions the interpretation of material heritage as an enduring expression of social relations, aesthetic values and authenticity which, once conferred, undergoes no subsequent change, and standard
The Culture and Civilisation of Ancient India in Historical Outline
Language: en
Pages: 243
Authors: Damodar Dharmanand Kosambi
Categories: Civilization
Type: BOOK - Published: 1965 - Publisher: London : Routledge and K. Paul
Books about The Culture and Civilisation of Ancient India in Historical Outline
Shanzhai
Language: en
Pages: 91
Authors: Byung-Chul Han
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-06 - Publisher: MIT Press
Tracing the thread of “decreation” in Chinese thought, from constantly changing classical masterpieces to fake cell phones that are better than the original. Shanzhai is a Chinese neologism that means “fake,” originally coined to describe knock-off cell phones marketed under such names as Nokir and Samsing. These cell phones were not crude forgeries but multifunctional, stylish, and as good as or better than the originals. Shanzhai has since spread into other parts of Chinese life, with shanzhai books, shanzhai politicians, shanzhai stars. There is a shanzhai Harry Potter: Harry Potter and the Porcelain Doll, in which Harry takes on his nemesis Yandomort. In the West, this would be seen as piracy, or even desecration, but in Chinese culture, originals are continually transformed—deconstructed. In this volume in the Untimely Meditations series, Byung-Chul Han traces the thread of deconstruction, or “decreation,” in Chinese thought, from ancient masterpieces that invite inscription and transcription to Maoism—“a kind a shanzhai Marxism,” Han writes. Han discusses the Chinese concepts of quan, or law, which literally means the weight that slides back and forth on a scale, radically different from Western notions of absoluteness; zhen ji, or original, determined not by an act of creation but by
The Japanese Professor
Language: en
Pages: 188
Authors: Gregory Scott Poole
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Brill / Sense
This book describes the resulting cultural debates and competing discourses that surround the key concepts in the work-life of Japanese professors.
Making Japanese Heritage
Language: un
Pages: 224
Authors: Christoph Brumann, Rupert A. Cox
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011 - Publisher:
This book examines the making of heritage in contemporary Japan, investigating the ways in which particular objects, practices and institutions are ascribed public recognition and political significance. Through detailed ethnographic and historical case studies, it analyses the social, economic, and even global political dimensions of cultural heritage. It shows how claims to heritage status in Japan stress different material qualities of objects, places and people - based upon their ages, originality and usage. Following on an introduction that thoroughly assesses the field, the ethnographic and historiographic case studies range from geisha; noh masks; and the tea ceremony; urban architecture; automata; a utopian commune and the sites of Mitsubishi company history. They examine how their heritage value is made and re-made, and appraise the construction of heritage in cases where the heritage value resides in the very substance of the object’s material composition - for example, in architecture, landscapes and designs - and show how the heritage industry adds values to existing assets: such as sacredness, urban charm or architectural and ethnic distinctiveness. The book questions the interpretation of material heritage as an enduring expression of social relations, aesthetic values and authenticity which, once conferred, undergoes no subsequent change, and standard
Copying the Master and Stealing His Secrets
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Brenda G. Jordan, Victoria Louise Weston
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-01-01 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
Examines the transmission of painting traditions in Japan.
Guide to Japan
Language: en
Pages: 103
Authors: United States. Navy. Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas
Categories: Japan
Type: BOOK - Published: 1945 - Publisher:
Books about Guide to Japan
Nature's Embrace
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Satsuki Kawano
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-03-31 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
In this study, anthropologist Satsuki Kawano examines Japan's changing death rites from the perspective of those who elect to have their cremated remains scattered and celebrate their return to nature.
Imitation and Creativity in Japanese Arts
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Michael Lucken
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-03-29 - Publisher: Columbia University Press
The idea that Japanese art is produced through rote copy and imitation is an eighteenth-century colonial construct, with roots in Romantic ideals of originality. Offering a much-needed corrective to this critique, Michael Lucken demonstrates the distinct character of Japanese mimesis and its dynamic impact on global culture, showing through several twentieth-century masterpieces the generative and regenerative power of Japanese arts. Choosing a representative work from each of four modern genres—painting, film, photography, and animation—Lucken portrays the range of strategies that Japanese artists use to re-present contemporary influences. He examines Kishida Ryusei's portraits of Reiko (1914–1929), Kurosawa Akira's Ikiru (1952), Araki Nobuyoshi's photographic novel Sentimental Journey—Winter (1991), and Miyazaki Hayao's popular anime film Spirited Away (2001), revealing the sophisticated patterns of mimesis that are unique but not exclusive to modern Japanese art. In doing so, Lucken identifies the tensions that drive the Japanese imagination, which are much richer than a simple opposition between progress and tradition, and their reflection of human culture's universal encounter with change. This global perspective explains why, despite its non-Western origins, Japanese art has earned such a vast following.